Colorado Supreme Court holds statute of limitations on wage claims runs from pay period following its due date

The Colorado Supreme Court held that the statute of limitations under the Colorado’s Wage Claim Act, CRS. 8-4-101 to -123, begins to run from the pay period when the wage first becomes due and is unpaid.

The facts of the case illustrate the importance of this holding. Like many states, Colorado’s wage claim laws permit an employee to sue at the time of termination for any unpaid wages. Most commonly wage claims involve amounts that are claimed due in that final paycheck, for example, vacation pay, but what about wages that were claimed due in prior periods? This case involved a group of workers who sought wages “as far back as 1992.” Colorado’s wage laws, like federal law (Fair Labor Standards Act, FLSA), set a 2-year statute of limitations on wage claims, or 3 years if the violation is deemed wilful. The plaintiffs argued that the Act allowed them to seek all of their claimed wages, going back decades. In contrast, the company argued that they could seek only wages that came due in their final paycheck, nothing earlier.

The Colorado Supreme Court disagreed with both parties, holding that the plaintiffs can seek any wages that came due in their final paychecks plus any that came due in the 2 years preceding their termination (or 3 if the claim is deemed wilful), but that they cannot seek wages going back farther than that.

We conclude that under section 109, terminated employees may seek wages or compensation that had been earned in prior pay periods but remain unpaid at  termination. This right, however, is subject to the statute of limitations in section 122, which runs from the date when the wages first became due and payable—the payday following the pay period in which they were earned. A terminated employee is thus limited to claims for the two (or three) years immediately preceding termination.

It is noted that the Court there said plaintiffs could seek claims for 2 (or 3) years “immediately preceding termination;” however, it would seem from the language of the Act and the Court’s own reasoning that the Court meant “immediately preceding (the filing of their lawsuit seeking wages upon) termination.” That issue is likely to be litigated in future cases.

Source: Hernandez v. Ray Domenico Farms, Inc., case no. 17SZ77 (Colo. 3/5/18).

Dissenter rights include ability to terminate non-compete?

The Colorado Court of Appeals held that a shareholder’s statutory dissent rights, in at least the facts of the case before it, included the ability to terminate an existing non-compete. In this case, the plaintiff was a doctor at and a shareholder of a clinic. When his clinic merged with another, he disagreed and exercised his statutory right under C.R.S. 7-113-202 to dissent and demand payment for the fair market value of his shares. In addition, he contested the continuing viability of his then-existing non-compete.

In this case, the Colorado Court of Appeals held that he was entitled to be paid the fair market value of his shares but added that he was also relieved of his non-compete. To hold otherwise, the Court of Appeals said, would “further penalize Crocker’s exercise of his right to dissent, rather than protect him from the conduct of the majority” who had voted for the merger.

The decision drew a dissent as to the ruling relieving him of the non-compete. It remains to be seen whether the case will be heard by the Colorado Supreme Court.

In analyzing the case, the Court of Appeals noted a variety of facts, including the geographic radius of the non-compete versus the location of the plaintiff’s residence. It also remains to be seen whether this decision will be limited to its facts.

Source: Crocker v. Greater Colorado Anesthesia, P.C., case no. 2018COA33 (Colo.App. 3/8/18).