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In another reversal, NLRB holds employers can issue so-called “gag orders” to protect the confidentiality of workplace investigations

The NLRB has ruled that employers can issue so-called “gag orders” to protect the confidentiality of workplace investigations. A typical “gag order” would be an instruction by the company to employees (and other witnesses) not to discuss matters relevant to an on-going investigation.

The decision triggered a heated dissent from one Board member who argued it will allow employers, in #MeToo type matters, to further keep secret wrongful matters, such as the details of sexual harassment.

In issuing its decision the Board held that such “gag orders” will, still, draw individualized case-by-case scrutiny from the Board when they are “not
limited on their face to open investigations
.”

In reaching its decision, the Board applied its new more permissive approach to analyzing handbooks and policies.

Source: Apogee Retail, 368 NLRB No. 144 (12/17/19).